Perceptions of faculty, students, and alumni regarding the doctoral program in educational administration at a selected university in the South

Michael Paul Shamblin

Abstract

The general purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of alumni, current students, and faculty members toward sixteen selected program characteristics of the doctoral program in educational administration at a selected university in the South. In addition, the study determined if differences existed in the perceptions of students based on gender or race and if differences existed in the perceptions of alumni based on gender or race. Further, the study considered if a relationship existed between the gender of alumni and their choice of Ph.D. or Ed.D. programs. To obtain the data, questionnaires marketed by Educational Testing Service as a part of its Graduate Program Self-Assessment Service were distributed to 16 faculty members, 75 current students, and 106 program alumni. Using a variety of Likert-type scales, the respondents rated various program characteristics, such as the quality of teaching. In addition, each respondent was asked to respond to a Part V that contained a variety of demographic items. Using t-tests for equality of means, no significant differences were found between female and male alumni's perceptions of program characteristics, between Black and White alumni's perceptions of program characteristics, between female and male student's perceptions of program characteristics, or between Black and White student's perceptions of program characteristics. However, a Chi-square test for goodness of fit showed that a statistically significant relationship existed between alumni gender and choice of Ph.D. or Ed.D. programs. Recommendations for further research include replication of the study at several universities representing various geographical regions of the country. Also, expansion of this type of program evaluation study to elementary and secondary levels of educational programs might prove beneficial.