Teacher, administrator, and student perceptions of the impact of block scheduling on high school discipline

Albert Lee Snow

Abstract

This research was designed to determine if teachers, administrators, and students differed in their perceptions of the impact of block scheduling on high school discipline. This study concentrated on teachers', administrators', and students' perceptions of the occurrence of 29 selected discipline problems on the block schedule as opposed to the traditional six or seven period school day. Seven high schools in south Mississippi were included in this study. County, parochial, municipal, urban, and rural school districts were included in the study. The schools ranged in size from under 300 to over 1,400 students. All schools surveyed had recently changed from a traditional six or seven period school day to a 4 x 4 block schedule or a modified block schedule. This study did indicate that there was a significant difference in how the different groups (teachers, administrators, and students) perceive the occurrence of discipline problems. Administrators strongly believed that the block schedule results in fewer discipline problems. Teachers also felt that the block schedule reduces discipline problems but not as strongly as administrators did. Students did not seem to think school schedule made a great deal of difference in the occurrence of discipline problems. All groups preferred to stay on the block schedule if discipline was the deciding factor.