Title

A pilot study of organizational performance, performance barriers and faculty engagement in the nursing education unit

Date of Award

2009

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Nursing

First Advisor

Patsy Anderson

Advisor Department

Nursing

Abstract

This pilot study was driven by the problem of market disequilibrium and the subsequent overarching desire to identify and describe principles and processes taken by nursing education units to optimize market equilibrium for nursing service in response to cyclical market demands. Given the complexities of market responsiveness in conjunction with changes in healthcare delivery, health economics, population demographics, higher education and other contextual factors, it is essential for nursing education as a whole to be in a position to respond to demand. The purpose of this study was to investigate organizational performance, performance barriers and faculty engagement in the nursing education unit in response to market demands for nursing services. Systems Theory served as the theoretical framework for this study since it was essential to consider individual nursing education units as an organizational entity. Based on the review of the literature, it appears that this study was primary in investigating the relationship between organizational performance, performance barriers and faculty engagement in the nursing education unit as it relates to response to market demands for nursing services. This pilot study used an evaluative research design and a survey approach to identify and describe the variables. The study relied on a researcher derived tool to measure organizational performance and performance barriers and an adaptation of an existing assessment instrument to measure faculty engagement in selected nursing education units. The findings were presented using statistical analysis congruent to the nature of the study. The results of the study were online with current literature, supportive of the research hypotheses and held substantive significance and rational correlations in regards to underlying theoretical frameworks and models. In this study, organizational performance through structure and function was maximized in the nursing education unit via an integration of programs offerings and flexibility well supported by resources and engaged faculty. The cursory assessment of organizational performance, performance barriers and faculty engagement in the nursing education unit provided more than anecdotal support of the value of market based program assessment and is worthy of further investigation.