Driving, Anger, Sensation Seeking, Narcissism, and Driver's Angry Thoughts in the Prediction of Unsafe Driving

Roy Preston White

Abstract

The present study expanded the previous research on multivariate prediction of unsafe driving behaviors. Specifically, the utility of combining driving anger, sensation seeking, narcissism, and driver's angry thoughts variables in the prediction of various unsafe driving behaviors and driving anger expression were assessed. In addition the present study sought to explore the predictive utility of driving anger and sensation seeking in a non-college sample. Three hundred and forty-nine college students completed measures of driving anger, sensation seeking, narcissism, driver's angry thoughts, unsafe driving behavior, and driving anger expression. Ninety eight non-college participants completed a subset of the previously mentioned measures. Hierarchical multiple regressions controlling for age, gender, and average miles driven per week supported the predictive utility of driving anger, sensation seeking, and driver's angry thoughts. Results demonstrated significant improvements in the prediction of various unsafe driving behaviors through the use of combining driving anger, sensation seeking, and driver's angry thoughts. Exploratory analyses also found differences with regard to retrospective and prospective data collection and between college and non-college participants on many variables.