Date of Award

Spring 5-2016

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

Committee Chair

Dr. Shuyan Wang

Committee Chair Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

Committee Member 2

Dr. Taralynn Hartsell

Committee Member 2 Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

Committee Member 3

Dr. Jonathan Beedle

Committee Member 3 Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

Committee Member 4

Dr. Kyna Shelley

Committee Member 4 Department

Educational Studies and Research

Abstract

This quantitative research study explored the relationship between students perceived computer self-efficacy and actual knowledge of computer related skills in computer hardware/technology, windows, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint and whether gender, race, and education level affected the research findings.

The participants in this study were students enrolled in an introductory computer concepts course at a community college located in the southeastern region of the United States. The computer course was a required for all students to receive an Associate of Arts and Associate of Applied Science degree. Data was collected in traditional face-to-face class sections and consisted of a pre- and post-computer self-efficacy survey and a pre- and post-test skills assessment on three different campuses. The scores in the area of computer hardware/technology, windows, Word, Excel, and Power Point were compared to determine whether a relationship exists between Computer self-efficacy and actual knowledge in the area of computers. In addition to a series of a one-way Analysis of Variance, a Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance and a Bivariate Correlation, the study also utilized descriptive analysis of demographic data and responses to a questionnaire regarding participant’s prior technology experience and usage.

Findings of the study indicated that students’ computer self-efficacy was much greater than actual knowledge in the area of computers. Findings of the study did show no significant difference in computer self-efficacy concerning gender, race, and education. No significant differences were found in the education level and skill level of the participants at the beginning of the CSC 1113 course. A significant difference was found in skill level among the different races at the beginning of the CSC 1113 course with the exception of Power Point. The study did show that there was no significant difference in skill level for gender except in the area of technology. The study found a positive correlation in the numbers of computer courses students completed in high school to computer self-efficacy at the beginning of the semester in the course CSC 1113.

At the completion of the course CSC 1113, Computer Concepts, computer self-efficacy scores were significantly higher. Findings also showed a significant increase in the skill levels, Windows, Word, Excel, and Power Point at the completion of the CSC 1113 course. The study had not shown significant difference in hardware/technology skills at the completion of the CSC 1113 course.