Title

IMPORTANCE OF FISH CONSUMPTION TO SPORT FISHERMEN - AN ECONOMIC-ANALYSIS

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-1-1991

Department

Political Science, International Development, and International Affairs

Abstract

This paper offers a theoretical and empirical rapprochement of the disparity that exists in the fishery social sciences concerning the sportfishing consumptive hypothesis. Case studies in the human dimensions literature may appear to reject the consumptive hypothesis that catch and retention are very important to some recreational angler groups. However, economic studies sometimes disagree with human dimensions in method and results. This inconsistency causes confusion among fishery managers when trying to interpret research findings. Recent literature focusing on the East Matagorda Bay, Texas, experience with red drum is reviewed as a case in point. This literature is expanded by identifying the motivation-satisfaction feedback effect as the frame of reference needed to place the consumptive issue in perspective. A shift in the fishing demand relationship is the link between economics and human dimensions. Results are not inconsistent with a rejection of the consumptive hypothesis because demand will not shift if (1) catch is unimportant or (2) catch is important to satisfaction, but there is no feedback.

Publication Title

FISHERIES

Volume

16

Issue

6

First Page

13

Last Page

19

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