Date of Award

5-2013

Degree Type

Honors College Thesis

Department

Human Performance and Recreation

First Advisor

Frederick Green, Ph.D.

Advisor Department

Human Performance and Recreation

Abstract

Moshing has been underrepresented in the research field. This is especially true in the area of Therapeutic Recreation. Moshing has been seen as a dangerous and violent form of dance. However, in a controlled environment moshing has the potential to be used as a therapeutic modality.

This study examined the effects of moshing on perceived stress, sense of belonging, and self esteem in undergraduate college students at the University of Southern Mississippi. Data was collected during a five-week moshing dance session through the use of three assessments/surveys, which included the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Rosenburg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and the Psychological Sense of School Membership Scale (PSSMS).

The researcher had no predictions of what the results may conclude. It was unknown whether or not moshing would have a positive or negative effect on perceived stress, sense of belonging, and self-esteem. The results suggested that moshing was slightly effective in reducing perceived stress. However, subjects’ self-esteem and sense of belonging significantly decreased during the study. Based upon the results of the study, moshing has the potential to be used in a therapeutic recreation program.