Date of Award

Fall 12-7-2018

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

School

Interdisciplinary Studies and Professional Development

Committee Chair

Dr. H. Quincy Brown

Committee Chair School

Interdisciplinary Studies and Professional Development

Committee Member 2

Dr. Heather M. Annulis

Committee Member 2 School

Interdisciplinary Studies and Professional Development

Committee Member 3

Dr. Cyndi H. Gaudet

Committee Member 3 School

Interdisciplinary Studies and Professional Development

Committee Member 4

Dr. Dale L. Lunsford

Committee Member 4 School

Interdisciplinary Studies and Professional Development

Abstract

Research supports the strategic role of a leader in improving individual and organizational performance (Day et al., 2009; Kaiser & Curphy, 2013). Developing leadership and enhancing leadership effectiveness remains at the forefront of organizational strategic plans (Day et al., 2009; Kaiser & Curphy, 2013). However, a majority of leadership development efforts fail in their purpose, which causes a leadership crisis in many organizations (Fernández-Aráoz, Roscoe, & Aramaki, 2017; Gurdjian, Halbeisen, & Lane, 2014; Kaiser & Curphy, 2013; Madanchian, Hussein, Noordin, & Taherdoost, 2017; Pfeffer, 2015; Wakefield, Abbatiello, Agarwal, Pastakia, & van Berkel, 2016). Neglecting the role of followership and using inappropriate measures of leadership effectiveness are among the reasons of ineffective leadership development programs.

This study examined a mechanism for leadership development and effectiveness consisting of the relationship between followership, leadership, and psychological capital. The study examined followership as a predictor and psychological capital as an outcome and measure of leadership effectiveness. The study also examined the relationship between followership behaviors and leadership behaviors that bring the greatest positive variance in psychological capital. Employing a non-experimental, predictive, cross-sectional research design, this study used partial least squares structural equation modeling to examine the research objectives. The data were collected using a convenience-sampling method from a sample of 92 students enrolled in a university.

The study finds active engagement dimension of followership a significant predictor of transformational, transactional, and passive/avoidant leadership. The independent thinking dimension of followership did not show a significant relationship with leadership. The study provides empirical evidence about followership behaviors and transformational leadership behaviors as predictors of followers’ psychological capital. The study empirically tested and confirmed the mediation of transformational leadership in the relationship between active engagement and psychological capital. The study also provides empirical evidence that active engagement, independent thinking, and transformational leadership jointly bring maximum variance in psychological capital. The results of the study provide information regarding potential benefits to leaders, instructors, higher education institutions, and scholars of leadership, followership, and psychological capital.

Available for download on Saturday, December 07, 2019

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