Date of Award

Summer 2019

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

School

Social Science and Global Studies

Committee Chair

Dr. Robert J. Pauly, Jr.

Committee Chair School

Social Science and Global Studies

Committee Member 2

Dr. Joseph St. Marie

Committee Member 2 School

Social Science and Global Studies

Committee Member 3

Dr. Iliyan Iliev

Committee Member 3 School

Social Science and Global Studies

Committee Member 4

Dr. Tom Lansford

Committee Member 4 School

Social Science and Global Studies

Abstract

This dissertation explores the effects of information and communication technology (ICT), education, and political institutionalization on fiscal state capacity in countries classified by the World Bank as upper middle, middle and low income. It presents a metric to explore how changes in information distributions through ICT, education, and political institutionalization mechanisms influence fiscal state capacity. To explore interrelated aspects of distinct information distribution conduits, the dissertation constructs a metric to analyze the effects of information distributions through ICT, educational participation and political institutionalization on fiscal state capacity, the dependent variable. It also explores joint and parallel effects of primary commodities for each of the three information distribution measures on fiscal state capacity. Further, it includes an exploration of regional effects for countries classified as upper middle, middle and low-income within Latin America and the Caribbean. Increases in information distribution parities in domestic populations are predicted to increase fiscal state capacity. The research approaches state capacity through a development framework, using labor and employment measures to reflect fiscal state capacity that is predicated on wider public interests. In so doing, it responds to calls in the literature for refinements on factors that explain fiscal state capacity in developing states and for further insights on how ICT influences development. Ultimately, the dissertation contributes to the literature through the presentation of a metric for exploring congruent information distribution mechanisms and through the construction of formal models that use panel data to explore how ICT, education, political institution and commodities influence fiscal state capacity.

Available for download on Monday, August 01, 2022

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