Title

Testing the Main Hypotheses of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior In a Large Diverse Sample of United States Military Personnel

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-1-2015

School

Psychology

Abstract

Background: Preliminary data indicate the suicide rate in the United States military decreased in 2013, but the National Guard saw a continued increase.

Method: We examined the utility of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior (IPTS) in a sample of US military personnel drawn largely from the National Guard (n = 934; 77.7% male; 59.5% white).

Results: Results indicated the interaction of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness predicted suicidal ideation and resolved plans and preparations for suicide. In each case, risk was greatest at higher levels of both predictors. Furthermore, results indicated the interaction of thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and acquired capability for suicide predicted prior suicide attempts. In this interaction term, the relationship between suicidal desire (thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness) and suicide attempts was significant and positive only at high levels of acquired capability. All analyses were cross-sectional.

Conclusions: Results indicate the IPTS may be useful for conceptualizing suicide risk in the National Guard.

Publication Title

Comprehensive Psychiatry

Volume

60

First Page

78

Last Page

85

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