Date of Award

5-2013

Degree Type

Honors College Thesis

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Christopher Barry, Ph.D.

Advisor Department

Psychology

Abstract

The present study examined the relation between parenting practices and grandiose and vulnerable narcissism. The study used the self-report data of 407 adolescents (348 males, 57 females, 2 unreported) who were enrolled in a residential program in the summer and fall of 2011 and 2012. Participants completed a battery of surveys, including the Pathological Narcissism Inventory and the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire. Findings link grandiose narcissism to positive parenting practices and poor monitoring and supervision, with positive reinforcement and poor monitoring and supervision predicting unique variance in adolescent grandiose narcissism. Vulnerable narcissism was significantly positively correlated with the negative parenting practices of inconsistent discipline and poor monitoring and supervision with inconsistent discipline predicting unique variance in adolescent vulnerable narcissism. The hypothesized interaction between positive reinforcement and poor monitoring and supervision in predicting grandiose narcissism was not supported; however, this interaction was significant for predicting vulnerable narcissism. Implications of these findings as well as limitations and directions for further research on parenting and adolescent pathological narcissism are discussed.

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