Author

Joel S. Ivy

Date of Award

12-2014

Degree Type

Honors College Thesis

Department

Management and International Business

First Advisor

Bruce Gilstrap, Ph.D.

Advisor Department

Management and International Business

Abstract

Research shows that religion has numerous effects on how people behave and act, so the goal of this study is to expand the body of knowledge about religion and see if it affects workplace behavior, specifically organizational citizenship behavior. Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is discretionary individual behavior that is not directly or explicitly recognized by the formal reward system and promotes the effective functioning of the organization. This study seeks to understand if religion, broken down further into internal and external religiosity, has any effects on how people behave at work. Further, if religion does have an effect on workplace behavior, this study seeks to understand what kind of effects, whether positive or negative, it is having and which of the various dimensions of OCB it is specifically affecting. Surveying over 150 employees, our findings indicate that internal religiosity have mostly positive effects on OCB while external religiosity mainly displayed negative effects. Further research is needed to understand why internal and external religiosity had, in general, opposite effects. Nevertheless, the results of this study seem to show that religion does have an effect on workplace behavior.

Comments

Honors College Award: Top Thesis

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