Date of Award

Fall 12-2017

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Political Science, International Development, and International Affairs

Committee Chair

Dr. Robert J. Pauly

Committee Chair Department

Political Science, International Development, and International Affairs

Committee Member 2

Dr. Robert Maxwell Press

Committee Member 2 Department

Political Science, International Development, and International Affairs

Committee Member 3

Dr. Tom Lansford

Committee Member 3 Department

Political Science, International Development, and International Affairs

Committee Member 4

Dr. David L. Butler

Committee Member 5

Dr. Jeffrey S. Lantis

Abstract

Strategic culture is a concept accepted by scholars and practitioners, but with problematic applicability to states newly independent or emerging from conflict. The elements that comprise strategic culture in the developed world are not always present in emerging states. This research addresses the pertinency of strategic culture in Uganda and Tanzania, and then tests the operationalization of the concept using the case of participation in the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM). The African Union and the international community expected Uganda and Tanzania to contribute troops to AMISON in 2007. In the event, Uganda did and Tanzania chose another path. This study shows that the actions of both states were consistent with their strategic cultures.

The small-n comparative study describes strategic culture as a concept that influences national security decisions, but does not determine them. Strategic culture is operationalized through path dependence, in which the accumulation of decisions over time create constraints and restraints upon decision-makers. Modes of behavior by the national security apparatus become too difficult or expensive to change. The result is a repertoire, or “tool box”, of national security activity reflective of the state’s unique strategic culture.

The sources of strategic culture are first considered to determine the applicability of the concept, which include explication of each states military history and experience, as well as resources, political systems, national security organization and geography, with a focus on ethnic geography. Those factors are then assessed against attributes derived from the definition of strategic culture to determine presence and level of maturity. Both states are found to possess an emerging strategic culture. How that influences the decision over AMISOM participation is then considered. The decision by Uganda is consistent with a strategic culture that favors military solutions for national security challenges. The decision by Tanzania to not contribute troops is also consistent with their strategic culture that offers a greater range of decision options, and does not favor military options.

ORCID ID

0000-0003-1915-9209

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